Scotland the Brave

It’s a brave thing that Scotland is about to do.

Are you for or against Scottish independence? I’ve been hauding ma wheesht for a long time on the matter. Thinking it through. But with a week to go until the big decider, I wanted to take part.

Wear it with pride @rossferg :-)

A post shared by Dan Dineen (@dandineen) on

I don’t get a vote in the #indyref because I live outside of Scotland. A fact that is very hard for a tartan-totting, loch-loving, bru-swilling born-n-bred Scotsman like me to bear. Instead I need to find other means of participation. People who know me know that I believe it’s incredibly important for citizens to engage in democratic processes like the opportunity presented to the people of Scotland on September 18th 2014.

On the night of the first televised debate I was in Scotland, back in my home town. Instead of sitting in the house glued to the Salmond and Darling Show, I was out the back of my pal’s house playing cricket. Cricket?! I never play cricket but here I am in Scotland, in the town where William Wallace killed his first Englishman, with two other fiercely-proud Scots, one of whom is a big ginger sporting a tattoo of the Lion Rampant on his leg, and we’re dabbling in a spot of leather on willow. My point being that these Scottish lads are fundamentally the same in outlook, values and spirit as my mates 500 miles to the south in Billericay.

For me, the differences aren’t so apparent between Scotland, England, Wales and Northern Ireland as to justify a yes vote. No one is oppressing us. We are a recognised nation. People beyond our shores already recognise and love Scottish. People get that we are different to the rest of the UK nations, yet we can still have all the benefits of association when we want it. Devolution has barely gotten started. We can have the best of all worlds, why limit ourselves on the basis of a plan that amounts to little more than a longwinded party manifesto. That’s my view. I’d be a no.

Whatever the result on the 18th, the Scottish people are going to have to go bravely into the future as one. What’s clear is that we have to reconcile ourselves quickly with the result and take full advantage of this renewed focus on being a nation again, a forward-thinking nation of people who are good to one another and good with other people beyond our already well-kent border – whether we’re an independent state or not.

I’d think it was the wrong decision to go independent, but if that’s the choice I’ll get fully behind it and help to make it work. Hell, I’ve seen enough of British politics to know it needs a big constitutional change to reinvigorate it. Independence isn’t what I had in mind but I’ll run with it, if my people make it clear that they want it.

But it has to be a clear result. The worst that could happen is that the people don’t turn out. The Scots have shown ourselves not to be the hottest at voting in recent opportunities, especially Scottish parliamentary elections. When I was up the road recently too many people said they might not bother voting. As a proud and passionate Scotsman that was hard to hear and I implored them tae think again. That’s why the news today that a historic 97% of the adult population registered to vote in the referendum is so amazing.

And that’s my say. Not to push an aye or a naw. But to push for Scotland the Brave. For Scotland to turnout in droves and make themselves heard whatever the decision. The legacy of this event depends on it.

Make sure you get involved. Good luck with it all folks.

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One thought on “Scotland the Brave

  1. Well said, sir. I’d be a yes, but I agree in principle with your point about everyone voting. My concern is for the hangover. It seems to me that a demonstration that your country is split on an issue like this is going to be hard to swallow, whichever side you are on. Why would I have voted yes? When I was growing up, England was always the source of our problems. We didn’t have to think through the facts. We never had to face the startling reality that Scots need to sort out their own problems. (It seems a long and weary road to a solution to have one of your own spend 40 years fighting his way to the top of the Labour Party only to do bugger all. Sorry, Gordon.) I understand that 50% of Scots will be sensible and stick with the status quo. My issue, one that made it very easy for me to leave, is that the status quo meant never facing up to deep, structural problems in Scottish society. We always had big brother next door to blame, or bail us out, depending on the circs.

    Anyways, I’m Canadian. So what do I know about politics! It’s effectively banned here, so no one gets very upset about anything. ; )

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